Announcing the 2017 Siskiyou Prize winner & finalists

By Midge Raymond,

Many congratulations to the winner of the 2017 Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature: Diana Hartel, for her essay collection Watershed Redemption: Journey in Time on Five U.S. Watersheds.

Judge Jonathan Balcombe writes of Diana’s book: “In Watershed Redemption, Diana Hartel’s sweeping, richly researched account conjures up a Bierstadt landscape. With elegant, crystal-clear prose, she weaves a dire yet hopeful tapestry of ecological ignorance, genocide, and tenacious activism. There is something for everyone—environmentalist, policy-maker, ethnologist, historian, biologist, epidemiologist, artist—in this powerful piece of advocacy.”

Diana Hartel writes on public health and ecosystem health issues. She graduated from Columbia University with a doctorate in epidemiology and concentrations in environment-related chronic diseases and infectious diseases. She has held faculty positions at Columbia University and Einstein College of Medicine in New York City, and has published widely for biomedical journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine. Additionally, she served at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, for three years, chairing inter-agency projects with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She created two non-profit organizations, Bronx Community Works in New York in 1993 and Madrona Arts in Oregon in 2006. Both organizations addressed issues of social and environmental issues. The Oregon-based Madrona Arts primarily employed visual and written arts to raise awareness of ecosystems and efforts to restore them to vibrant health.

[Photo by David Winston]

Diana will receive a four-week residency at PLAYA and a $1,000 cash prize. 

We are also delighted to announce the prize finalists and semi-finalists:

Finalists
  • Crusoe, Can You Hear Me?: A novel by Deborah Tomkins
  • Lost Coast: A young-adult novel by Geneen Marie Haugen
Semi-finalists
  • Farm to Fable: The Fictions of Our Animal-Consuming Culture by Robert Grillo
  • Xylotheque: Essays by Yelizaveta Renfro
  • Junk Raft: An ocean voyage and rising tide of activism to fight plastic pollution by Marcus Eriksen

 

A very special thanks to all writers who entered the contest … your support makes this prize possible!

Vegan dining in Sydney: Golden Lotus

By Midge Raymond,

We discovered Golden Lotus in the Newtown neighborhood of Sydney, aptly called Vegantown. If you stroll along King Street, you’ll find a number of vegan options, and this all-vegan Vietnamese restaurant is well worth checking out.

The restaurant has a lovely casual atmosphere, and as always, it’s fantastic to be in an all-vegan place where you can order anything from the menu without having to ask a lot of questions.

We began with “chicken” satay skewers, which were perfectly cooked — crispy on the outside and tender on the inside — and smothered with peanut sauce.

There were so many good things on the menu, it was hard to decide. Ultimately we went for the lemongrass “chicken,” accompanied by brown rice, which was a little crispy on the outside and bursting with lemongrass.

We also sampled assorted veggies with “chicken” on a hot plate, which had a lovely garlicky sauce.

Golden Lotus is one of many fantastic restaurants in Vegantown — and we recommend it highly when you’re in Sydney. Learn more here.

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Meet the yellow-eyed penguin

By Midge Raymond,

When John and I went to the southern tip of New Zealand hoping to catch a glimpse of the rare, endangered yellow-eyed penguin (the Maori name is hoiho), we would’ve been happy for even a brief glimpse. These penguins are not only among the rarest on earth — there are only an estimated 4,000 left in the world — they are also very shy.

Yet our willingness to sit quietly for hours in the cold — and, often, rain — paid off when we were able to witness these gorgeous birds coming ashore to feed their chicks.

Very unfortunately, the penguins are endangered in part because humans ignore the signs around their nesting sites and walk across the paths that the penguins take to reach their nests. If a penguin comes ashore and finds humans in its way, it will return to sea, leaving its chicks hungry.

We spoke at length to a wonderful naturalist who was there on behalf of the Department of Conservation, volunteering his time for hours every night to help ensure the penguins have a safe path to get to their chicks. Nevertheless, we witnessed several occasions on which he asked visitors not to cross the paths, explaining that to do so would endanger the lives of these very rare birds … and then watched as these people went right ahead anyway, disregarding the naturalist’s pleas to help protect the birds. It was astonishing, and more than a little depressing; it would take so little so help save these birds, but many of the tourists couldn’t be bothered.

Upon returning home, we got in touch with the Southland District Council and the South Catlins Charitable Trust to voice our concerns, and we received a warm response back, both sharing our concerns and outlining new initiatives that are being planned to help protect these penguins. Of course, the birds have other threats — among them, fishing, climate change, and ocean pollution — but the good news is that these are things we can all do something about, wherever we may live.

As you can see from these photos, all taken by John, the yellow-eyed penguins are uniquely beautiful, with their yellow eyes and the glowing yellow feathers around them, and they make their homes in the rainforesty scrubs and grasses off the shore, usually walking across tide pools and up steep rock embankments to get to their nests. We do hope to return to this area one day, and we hope to find many more yellow-eyed penguins, instead of fewer.

Vegan dining in New Zealand: BurgerFuel

By Midge Raymond,

Most of our time on New Zealand’s South Island was spent on (the left side of) the road … and so we were glad to discover BurgerFuel, a fast-food restaurant with several delicious vegan options. We stopped here on our way through both Invercargill and Timaru as we ventured to the distant places where we would be doing our wildlife watching.

Among the vegan options we sampled at BurgerFuel were the Combustion Tofu Burger, made with organic tofu, teriyaki and peanut satay sauces, smashed avocado, salad, relish, and vegan aioli (be sure to request that the aioli is vegan).

We also tried the V-Twin Vege patty, made with mushroom, kumara, chickpeas, and basil with melted vegan cheese, plum sauce, and relish — it was a very different mix of flavors compared to the simpler tofu burger, but it was very good, especially if you’re up for something different. We naturally got fries to accompany our burgers, and the fries are amazing.

Best of all, though, are the milkshakes, made with soy milk — they are thick, creamy, and flavorful. It’s such a treat to go to a fast-food place that not only has vegan meal options but vegan milkshake options. We highly recommend chocolate.

BurgerFuel has locations not only in New Zealand but Australia, Egypt, and Iraq, among others — and even the U.S., in Indiana…and here’s hoping they expand much further. Even better, here’s hoping they go the way of Australia’s Lord of the Fries, which recently became all vegan.

  Category: On travel, Vegan
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Vegan dining in Melbourne: Smith & Deli

By Midge Raymond,

Most plant-based people know of the fantastic Smith & Daughters restaurant in Melbourne’s Fitzroy neighborhood, but not to be missed is its takeaway counterpart, Smith & Deli, which is a couple of blocks around the corner.

It’s a sweet little storefront deli and grocery, offering not just amazing breakfasts, sandwiches, and sweets but an abundance of vegan grocery items, from candy and cookies to ice cream and cheeses.


The deli and supermarket also sells T-shirts, buttons, pins, aprons, and more with its logo and other vegan-friendly messages.

It was hard to choose what to order, but we were thrilled with our choices: the “chicken” salad sandwich on sourdough was huge and incredibly tasty.

The rueben also received high praise from its consumer. The one consideration with Smith & Deli is having a spot to enjoy your takeaway; we were fortunate to have avoided the rain and enjoyed our lunch in a nearby park.

We can’t recommend this place enough for a terrific lunch or takeaway, as well as for stocking up on all your vegan essentials. (Also be sure to find Fitzroy’s Cruelty Free Shop, where you can do even more extensive shopping.)

  Category: On travel, Vegan
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