Category: Vegan

Vegan dining in Fremantle, Perth, Western Australia

By Midge Raymond,

While wandering around the lovely Fremantle neighborhood just outside of Perth, we were thrilled to come across Chic Pea Vegan Cafe, which is located in the must-see Fremantle Markets.


This tiny little place has limited seating and a short menu, but everything is fresh and made to order.

It was a perfect day to sit outside, and we enjoyed the message on the sidewalk table just in front of the cafe.

The chick-pea wrap was delicious, a big healthy salad served inside a huge toasted flatbread.

The pasty was equally delicious, served hot and bursting with Indian-inspired spices.

While several of its main attractions are prison-related, Fremantle is a great place to shop and a beautiful coastal region visit — and especially to eat (it’s also home to this vegan ice cream shop).

  Category: On travel, Vegan
  Comments: Comments Off on Vegan dining in Fremantle, Perth, Western Australia

Vegan dining in Sydney: The Green Lion Pub

By Midge Raymond,

Sydney is a fantastic place to enjoy vegan food, and among its treasures is The Green Lion pub, located in the Rozelle neighborhood (about an hour’s walk or 20-minute bus ride from Sydney’s central business district).

You can order food from the bar downstairs, but the dining room is upstairs, where the remnants of the former Red Lion Hotel can be seen behind the bar.

All the beer and wine served at the bar is vegan.

And the menu is mostly pub food in all its glory, from vegan burgers and dogs to pizza. The “chicken” burger was fantastic, as were the fries it comes with.

Slightly healhtlier but no less delicious was the “chicken” caesar salad, with homemade creamy dressing and crispy vegan chicken.

The Green Lion also has delicious-looking desserts, which (alas) we didn’t save room for. But the lovely atmosphere nearly tempted us to stay until dinner to eat again.

The Green Lion is an absolute must when you visit Sydney. In the meantime, follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

The Siskiyou Prize closes on December 31

By Midge Raymond,

If you’re planning to submit to our fourth annual Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature, the window is closing fast … submissions close on December 31, 2017.

Our 2017 judge is New York Times bestselling author Jonathan Balcombe. Jonathan’s most recent book is What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of our Underwater Cousins, an extraordinary journey underwater that reveals the vast capabilities of fishes. He is also the author of the books The Exultant Ark, Second Nature, Pleasurable Kingdom, and The Use of Animals in Higher Education. Jonathan has three biology degrees, including a PhD in ethology (the study of animal behavior) from the University of Tennessee, and has published more than 50 scientific papers on animal behavior and animal protection. Learn more at

The 2017 prize is open to unpublished manuscripts and books published within the last five years. The winner will receive $1,000 and a four-week residency at PLAYAAll Siskiyou Prize submissions will be considered for publication from Ashland Creek Press. Visit the Siskiyou Prize website for complete details and to submit.

The deadline for submissions is December 31, 2017.

Please feel free to share this announcement with fellow writers! We look forward to reading your work.

New environmental literature refers to literary works that focus on the environment, animal protection, ecology, and wildlife. The prize seeks work that redefines our notions of environmentalism and sustainability, particularly when it comes to animal protection. The award isn’t for books about hunting, fishing, or eating animals — unless they are analogous to a good anti-war novel being all about war. Under these basic guidelines, however, the prize will be open to a wide range of fiction and nonfiction with environmental and animal themes.

For more information, visit the Siskiyou Prize website, and if you have any questions that aren’t covered in the guidelines or FAQ, feel free to contact us.


Vegan dining in San Diego’s Little Italy

By Midge Raymond,

I was delighted to learn that San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood has among its many Italian restaurants and cafes one known for its vegan menu: Civico 1845.

One of the great things about this restaurant is that it brings the vegan menu to your table along with its regular menu and wine list, unlike some restaurants in which you need to ask for the vegan menu (or those in which the vegan menu is such a secret you don’t even know to ask).

Even the wine list noted the vegan options with a (V), which was wonderfully helpful. We began with pinot noir and the oyster mushroom “calamari.”

This appetizer was very good, and would probably be a hit with omnivores as well due to the texture: these mushrooms are lightly fried and chewy, with thin tendrils that melt in your mouth. The arrabbiata sauce was a bit watery and quite bland, unfortunately, but it was otherwise a lovely dish.

For our main courses we sampled the Ravioli Boscailoa, house-made mushroom ravioli with truffle sauce, and the Fettuccine alla Bolognese, house-made fettuccine with slow-cooked seitan ragout.

The Ravioli Boscailoa was our favorite…beautifully cooked ravioli with a wonderful mushroom filling, accompanied by a sauce that managed to be light and rich at the same time. The wild mushrooms gave the whole dish a big burst of flavor.

The fettuccine dish was also good — the seitan and the bolognese sauce had a robust “sausage” flavor (and was topped with nutritional yeast instead of parmesan), but the fettuccine was a bit overcooked and overall this dish wasn’t nearly as inspired.

Overall, this wasn’t the best vegan Italian (sadly, our very favorite, Portobello in Portland, Oregon, is closed), but it would be a wonderful choice for those visiting San Diego with omnivores, as it’s so easy to order off the vegan menu without having to ask a lot of questions or make special requests.

And if you are in San Diego’s Little Italy and looking for a completely plant-based dining experience, try Cafe Gratitude, which has an abundance of options, including wine, beer, and cocktails and a great happy hour.

Vegan dining in Melbourne & Sydney: Lord of the Fries

By Midge Raymond,

One of the best vegan discoveries during our trip to Australia was Lord of the Fries. (I should add that this was good for our taste buds, but perhaps not ideal for our health: Lord of the Fries is vegan fast-food takeaway: not the healthiest but definitely delicious.)

We first discovered Lord of the Fries in downtown Melbourne, which has two locations, one on Swanston Street and another at the Flinders Street train station.


The menu is entirely vegetarian, but most of the items, including milkshakes, can easily be made vegan. (UPDATE: As of November 2017, this restaurant is 100 percent vegan! Thrilling news.)


As you can see from the menu, it’s definitely fast food — but it’s incredibly delicious.


Among the very best sandwiches is the “chick’n” sandwich, which comes with vegan cheese and your choice of vegan sauces.


We also tried the burger, which was great and nicely loaded up with veggies (adding the illusion of a healthy meal….).


The breakfast sandwich were my very favorites, as these are nearly impossible to find in the States. They are made with a tofu “egg” and come with vegan cheese as well as a “meat” option if you’d like.


The fries are delicious and come in many forms, from shoestring to sweet potato. Tip: get your sauce on the side, unless you like smothered, soggy fries. The onion rings are divine: very crispy on the outside and perfect and flavorful on the inside.


The only thing we didn’t like was the hot dog, which arrived with not-quite-melted cheese and a too-large doughy bun. Perhaps this was an anomaly, but it was not at all appealing.


Most of the locations are takeaway, but there are a few with seats, including the one in the Fitzroy neighborhood of Melbourne.


We were thrilled to see this Australian chain always busy. Lord of the Fries not only helps the planet by being plant-based, but in addition its food is locally sourced and the chain recycles its cooking oil to fuel its delivery trucks. We hope that, as the sign reads, ethical fast food becomes a thing not just down south but around the world as well.




  Category: Vegan
  Comments: Comments Off on Vegan dining in Melbourne & Sydney: Lord of the Fries