Category: On animals


An inspiring visit to Farm Sanctuary

By Midge Raymond,

I was so glad to be able to join Love Rhymes with Everything authors Dana Feagin (a Sanctuary One board member) and Kat von Cupcake (a Sanctuary One former board member and adopter) for a visit to Farm Sanctuary in Orland, California, for the sanctuary’s Twilight Tour (followed by the best vegan happy hour ever).

It was a wonderful opportunity to visit with the sanctuary animals (who loved the additional affection from visitors) and to learn more about how their lives have turned around thanks to those who do the important work of rescue and providing a safe home.

It was a broiling-hot day in Orland, but all of the animals were cool and happy; the barns had misting fans, and staff and volunteers made sure to keep the animals comfortable…such a contrast to their former lives on factory farms. The Orland sanctuary is on 300 acres, with more than 300 rescued farm animals, including pigs, sheep, goats, cows, chickens, turkeys, chickens, and waterfowl.

Because this was a Twilight Tour, one of the topics was bedtime for the animals, most of whom are only able to sleep for the very first time once they arrive at the sanctuary. Due to the horrible conditions at factory farms, animals from pigs to chickens don’t ever get to fall sleep (to lower one’s guard even for a moment means getting trampled or suffocated), which means they live their entire short lives under unbearable stress.

National Shelter Director Susie Coston talked about how the animals’ lives change so much when they arrive at the sanctuary; they can finally sleep in peace, for the first time in their lives, in addition to being able to enjoy other natural behaviors, like snuggling with others and being able to stay with their families. The animals also tend to sleep very deeply; Susie says that the sanctuary staff often receive concerned calls and emails from people watching the Farm Sanctuary Live Cam: the animals sleep so soundly that viewers worry they may be sick or injured. (Visit explore.org to virtually visit the sheep and turkey barns, the pig and cow pastures, the cattle pond, and more. And don’t panic if the animals don’t move for a while! When we visited the pig barns in person, the pigs were so happy and relaxed they didn’t even look up; they enjoyed belly rubs and ear scritches with their eyes closed.)

During our visit we also got a chance to chat with President and Co-Founder Gene Baur, who gave an inspiring talk about reaching out with kindness to educate those who don’t realize how much these animals suffer, and how making compassionate choices leads to a better world for animals, humans, and the planet.

Sanctuary One wildfire evacuees are up for adoption!

By Midge Raymond,

It’s been a fiery, smoky summer in Southern Oregon, and last week Sanctuary One evacuated its 60 animals — including pigs, goats, sheep, alpacas, horses, duck, geese, dogs, cats, and rabbits — as nearby wildfires got closer. It was a tremendous community effort, which you can read about here on the sanctuary blog, and here in the Mail Tribune.

Brian, Operations Manager, watering down Sanctuary One’s 100-year-old barn

 

John and I went out to the farm on Thursday to pick up three of the sanctuary’s feline evacuees: Thor, Bear, and Harlan. We want to share a little bit about these cats because, like all of Sanctuary One’s animals, they are still up for adoption even while they are in temporary foster homes.

The first thing you should know about these three cats is that they are awesome. The second thing you should know is that all three kitties have Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). This means that Thor, Bear, and Harlan must be indoors-only and should live as only cats, or with other cats who also have FIV to prevent spreading the virus to non-FIV cats (the virus is mainly spread through bites). FIV-positive cats are otherwise very much like any other house cat; they can live long, healthy lives and don’t need any special medication. (Also, FIV cannot be transmitted to humans or other animals.) Learn more about FIV here.

Now, more about the cats! Let’s begin with Thor & Bear, a bonded pair who are best buddies and are looking for a home together.

Thor is a gorgeous tabby who’s had a tough life…he was found on the streets after a mighty battle, and he is not only FIV-positive but he’s missing one of his back legs. Yet this hasn’t slowed him down one bit … this tiny five-year-old can be shy and skittish as he learns to trust you, but he’s the feisty one of these three for sure and can definitely hold his own. (Just watch Bear try to take a bite of his food.) Most of all, he is a total lovebug; he loves chin scritches, sitting on your lap, and he can snuggle forever. He’s got an amazing purr and is insanely soft.

Thor’s best buddy, Bear, is a gentle giant at 14 pounds. (He’s not fat, just big-boned.)

Bear is also a snuggler — he loves laps (he and Thor have both climbed into my lap at once for snuggles) and he is incredibly mellow and sweet. He and Thor often head-butt and snuggle with each other, and they are a beautiful pair. It’s hilarious to watch Bear eye Thor’s food … if he gets too close, Thor will sometimes give him a little swat, but usually it takes no more than a stern look, and Bear will back away and wait patiently until Thor is finished, then go lick the bowl. Bear is 10 years old but incredibly playful, chasing toys around like a cat half his age. He’s also an Olympic-class napper and loves thick blankets and warm sunny spots.

And finally, there’s Harlan.

Those of you who know our late, beloved General Manager know that we have a soft spot for orange and white cats, and of course Harlan is no exception. Like so many orange cats, he’s got a big personality and is tons of fun. Harlan is five years old and as playful as a kitten; he loves playing with wand toys but often just finds random things to chase and attack. He is also extremely curious and has explored places we didn’t even know a cat could get to.

Somehow he does it all with so much grace, getting in and out of odd places without any harm to himself or the house.

Harlan does very well with his two roommates and is a very easygoing, mellow kitty — but he’s also independent and entertains himself. He loves people and will stretch out next to you; he also loves being held if he’s in the mood. We suspect one day he will be a lap cat … he’s 100% not there yet, but he’s very affectionate and adores attention.

We really can’t say enough about how much we love our temporary new housemates. We were thrilled to be in a position to take them in, and it’s a privilege to share our lives with them as they await their permanent homes.

If you are looking for a cat, or two, or all three — please visit the Sanctuary One website for more info on each of these kitties, and to get started, fill out the sanctuary adoption form here. You are also welcome to contact us if you have any questions about them before or during the adoption process. Please also feel free to share this with anyone in the Rogue Valley who may be looking for a feline companion (or two, or three).

And if you aren’t able to adopt one of these charming boys, a gift to Sanctuary One will help them care for these three and many more!

Our 2017 Siskiyou Prize judge is Jonathan Balcombe

By Midge Raymond,

We are thrilled to announce that our 2017 Siskiyou Prize judge is Jonathan Balcombe.

Jonathan’s most recent book is the New York Times bestseller What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of our Underwater Cousins, an extraordinary journey underwater that reveals the vast capabilities of fishes. He is also the author of the books The Exultant Ark, Second Nature, Pleasurable Kingdom, and The Use of Animals in Higher Education.

Jonathan has three biology degrees, including a PhD in ethology (the study of animal behavior) from the University of Tennessee, and has published more than 50 scientific papers on animal behavior and animal protection. Formerly department chair for Animal Studies with the Humane Society University and senior research scientist with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Jonathan is currently Director of Animal Sentience with the Humane Society Institute for Science and Policy in Washington, DC. Learn more at jonathan-balcombe.com.

This year marks our fourth annual Siskiyou Prize, and we are delighted to be offering a $1,000 prize and a four-week writing residency thanks to the generosity of our amazing prize partner PLAYA. All manuscripts submitted for the prize will be considered for publication by Ashland Creek Press.

Please visit the Siskiyou Prize website for complete details about the prize — submissions open September 1, 2017. We look forward to reading your work!

The General Manager has left the building

By John Yunker,

As many of you know, Theo is our General Manager. But most of you do not know the story of how he became our GM.

In 1999, we were living in Boston in a fourth-floor walkup studio. My coworker had adopted a cat from a shelter south of Boston. At just nine months of age, this little cat was terrorizing her first cat, a cat twice his size. Near tears one morning, she told me she had to return him to the shelter.

We had wanted a cat for years but our lease wouldn’t allow it. But we were worried about this feisty cat’s fate and didn’t want to see him returned to the shelter, where he might not have had another chance at finding a home.

We couldn’t get official approval from our landlord, but he lived below us (with his dog) and gave us unofficial approval. And so we took my co-worker’s cat home.

 

Theo was his name and we never considered changing it.

He was a holy terror. He was missing two toes from his back leg. Had been hit by a car was the official story. But it was clear he had been starved as well. So young and so sadly obsessed with food. Got us up at all hours of the night. We tried free-feeding, but he nearly doubled his weight in month. So from then on he was on a controlled diet. I remember thinking at one point we should have just had a child as eventually they let you sleep the night through.

And then it occurred to me that we did have a child.

Ira, our friend who is now with Theo, once said, as he watched Theo walk into a room, “That cat oozes testosterone.” And did he ever.

From Boston to San Diego, Seattle and then Ashland, he traveled with us, wanted to be with us always.

Eighteen years.

We had our challenges along the way. We could never adopt other cats or dogs because he had such a hot temper; he barely tolerated us at times. And then there were the emergency room visits. A urinary blockage one year. Diabetes a few years later. A torn ligament in his knee that had to be replaced. In the end, it was a tumor in his jaw that he couldn’t overcome.

We started Ashland Creek Press on a whim. Not knowing where it would lead us. We adopted Theo on a whim as well. Funny how those things you do on a whim end up changing your lives for the better. We regret not a single day. We only regret that we did not have more of them.

He made us more patient, more flexible. He gave us so many wonderful memories. His stubbornness inspires our writing, our publishing, keeps us going in the face of rejection.

He was an indoor cat all his life, but boy did he love to go on walks.

So we will leave the position of GM open for now. We think it will take 3 or 4 felines at least to fill his shoes, or paws. And, after a time of mourning, we will try to fill them.

We had eighteen wonderful years with Theo. Right about the time many parents are sending their children off to college, we had to send ours off as well.

Such is life.

And such an empty nest.

Theo
1999-2017

 

Saving the planet begins on our plates

By Midge Raymond,

It’s frustrating to go to an fundraiser for an animal rescue and find animals on the menu. Many organizations that believe in saving cats and dogs unfortunately do not believe in sparing cows, pigs, or chickens. Slowly, education and progress is happening — Animal Place‘s Food for Thought program offers wonderful tools to help organizations see that all animals matter — yet many organizations still resist.

Likewise, very few environmental organizations make the connection between animal agriculture (which is responsible for more greenhouse gases than all forms of transportation combined) and the environment — and yet this is a vital connection to make, especially during a time when our government is rolling back environmental protections. We as citizens and consumers can do so much good simply by making wiser choices — not only in how we get to work but what we put on our plates. Consider these statistics, from the Cowspiracy website (Cowspiracy is a must-see film about the connections between environmental degradation and animal agriculture):

  • Even without fossil fuels, we will exceed our 565 gigatons CO2e limit by 2030, all from raising animals.
  • Animal agriculture water consumption ranges from 34-76 trillion gallons annually, compared to 70-140 billion from fracking.
  • Growing feed crops for livestock consumes 56% of the water in the US.
  • 2,500 gallons of water are needed to produce 1 pound of beef.
  • 5% of water consumed in the US is by private homes; 55% of water consumed in the US is for animal agriculture.
  • Livestock covers 45% of the earth’s total land.
  • Animal agriculture is the leading cause of species extinction, ocean dead zones, water pollution, and habitat destruction.
  • 3/4 of the world’s fisheries are exploited or depleted — we could see fishless oceans by 2048.
  • For every 1 pound of fish caught, up to 5 pounds of unintended marine species are caught and discarded as by-catch.

There is good news, however: Increasing numbers of animal rescues see the myriad benefits of protecting all animals, and some environmental organizations do realize that saving the planet means being plant-based. I reached out to many of them to learn how they came to this realization and how they deal with those who challenge them … and most of all, to thank them.

All rescue and environmental organizations need to consider their food policies in order to truly do their best for animals and the planet. Oceanic Preservation Society executive director Louis Psihoyos puts it well: “You have to walk the walk in the environmental movement. I don’t believe in gray areas in this issue…People are starting to understand that the best way to make changes for the environment is to change what’s on your plate.” And GREY2K USA president Christine A. Dorchak says, “Helping dogs while hurting cows, pigs, or chickens just doesn’t make sense.”

I spoke with Barbara Troyer of Food for Thought, as well as the executive directors of Alley Cat Allies, Animals Asia, the Beagle Freedom Project, Foster Parrots, Grey2K, Oceanic Preservation Society, St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center, Sanctuary One, and the Washington Federation of Animal Care and Control Agencies. I ended up so inspired by their passion for and dedication to the animals, the environment, and to making the world a better place. You can learn more about all these wonderful organizations in these two articles in Barefoot Vegan Magazine and in VegNews.