Category: News from Ashland Creek Press

Introducing the ACP Book Bag

By John Yunker,

Thanks to Ashland (and many other cities) banning plastic bags, we thought we all could use a great grocery/book/everything bag. (We’re also enjoying the chance to show our Oregon pride.)

We created a small quantity of these recycled-cotton bags — environmentally friendly, fair-labor produced — and so far, it’s been perfect for books, groceries, and everything else we’ve toted around. It’s lightweight (folds easily into a smaller bag), durable, and, if we might say so, quite good-looking.

acp book bag

If you’d like to order a bag of your own, you can do so here.

Or get the bag free when you order this ACP Book Bundle.

Thanks for your support of ACP and the planet!

Call for Submissions: Writing for Animals Nonfiction Anthology

By John Yunker,

Ashland Creek Press is currently accepting nonfiction submissions for a new anthology, Writing for Animals: An anthology for writers and instructors to educate and inspire.

From Franz Kafka’s Report to the Academy to Karen Joy Fowler’s We Are Completely Beside Ourselves, animals have played a central role in literature. Increasingly, writers are playing a central role in advancing awareness of animal issues through the written word.

And yet little has been written about the process of writing about animals—from crafting point of view to voice. Writers who hope to raise awareness face many questions and choices in their work, from how to educate without being didactic to how to develop animals as characters for an audience that still views them as ingredients. We hope to address these issues and more with a new collection of articles, by writers and for writers—but most of all, for the animals.

We seek articles from authors and educators about the process of writing about animals in literature.* Our focus is on including a mix of instructional and inspirational articles to help readers not only improve their work but be inspired to keep at it. Articles may be previously published and should not exceed 10,000 words.

There is no deadline at this time; we will accept submissions on a rolling basis until further notice. Accepted submissions will receive a stipend of $100 plus a copy of the finished book upon publication.

*Please note that this is a collection of instructional articles about the craft of writing. We will NOT be publishing animal stories or personal essays, only articles that deal specifically with the art and craft of writing about animals.

Areas of interest include:

  • Anthropomorphism and writing from the animal’s point of view
  • The rethinking of animal-centric idioms (such as “fish out of water” or “kill two birds with one stone”)
  • How to elevate animals from “set pieces” to “characters” in your writing
  • How to address violence toward animals
  • Animal rescue themes
  • Animals and “personhood”
  • The “animal turn” and what it means for animal-centric literature
  • Animals in children’s literature

For all submissions, please include (in a single document) the entire essay and an author bio listing all publishing credits, awards, and experience. Include a valid e-mail address, mailing address, and phone number.

And, just to be clear, we are not looking for essays about animals. We are looking for articles about writing about animals.

All submissions must be made using Submittable.


Among Animals 2 is under way

By Midge Raymond,

We are delighted with this new review of our critically acclaimed anthology, Among Animals, from Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies: “…a rich collection of stories that constitute not only a good read, but also a substantial text for an Animal Studies course…the collection demands an acknowledgment of the vulnerability, fierceness, and beauty of its subjects.”

Indeed, the first edition of Among Animals has been adopted for numerous courses, in the fields of both animal studies and literature, and we are excited to report that Among Animals 2 is well under way.


We plan to post an excerpt soon, but for now you can click here to get a glimpse of what’s to come — more thoughtful, engaging stories about our complicated relationship with our fellow creatures.

Announcing the Siskiyou Prize winner and finalists

By Midge Raymond,

We are delighted to announce Jennifer Boyden has won the 2015 Siskiyou Prize for her novel THE CHIEF OF RALLY TREE.


Of THE CHIEF OF RALLY TREE, judge Ann Pancake writes: “Inventive, smart, and often hilariously funny, The Chief of Rally Tree delivers a social critique both searing and sly.”

Jennifer Boyden is the author of two books of poetry, The Declarable Future (University of Wisconsin Press, 2013), winner of The Four Lakes Prize in Poetry; and The Mouths of Grazing Things (University of Wisconsin Press, 2010), winner of The Brittingham Prize in Poetry. She is a recipient of the PEN Northwest Wilderness Writing Residency and has taught writing and literature courses at a variety of places, including Suzhou University in China, The Sitka Center for Arts and Ecology, Whitman College, and at various workshops. On the faculty of Eastern Oregon University’s low-residency MFA program, Jennifer also works for an environmental nonprofit in the San Juan Islands. She lives in Friday Harbor, Washington.

The two prize finalists are the novel THE PLACE WITH NO NAME, by José María Merino, translated from the Spanish by Elizabeth Polli, and the essay collection THE SHAPE OF MERCY: ESSAYING THE GEOGRAPHY OF HOME by Alison Townsend.


The Siskiyou Prize is named for the Klamath-Siskiyou region of northern California and southern Oregon, one of the most diverse eco-regions in the world. The annual award is open to unpublished, full-length prose manuscripts, including novels, memoirs, short story collections, and essay collections. The winner receives a cash award of $1,000, a residency at PLAYA, and an offer of publication by Ashland Creek Press.

Thanks to all who submitted to the prize for your support of environmental literature. For more information, and to learn about next year’s prize, visit

Images of wildlife and road ecology

By Midge Raymond,

As many of us know, living among wildlife can be as dangerous as it is wonderful, due to the fact that, at some point, animals need to cross our roads. Fortunately, people like Marcel Huijser are working toward making our roads safer for all of us, with a special eye for helping out the animals.

A quick glance at Huijser’s website might seem, at first, a bit distressing — you’ll see gorgeous images of live animals, as well as those who have been killed by cars — but you’ll also see photos of mitigation measures designed to reduce the number of wildlife-vehicle collisions…and this (along with the abundance of phenomenal wildlife images), make this site and blog well worth a visit.

Huijser is both a photographer and a road ecologist; he works toward finding safe passages for wildlife among the highways and bridges among which animals live (learn more in this profile published last year in High Country News). On Huijser’s website, you’ll find a fascinating collection of photos of road ecology at work —  wildlife overpasses, wildlife fencing and “jump-outs”  to allow animals to escape from fenced areas, high-tech animal detection systems that detect large animals on the road and provide alerts, and more.

Visit Marcel Huijser’s website to learn more — perhaps you’ll find an idea perfect for your own community. We’d certainly love to see some animal detection systems to help protect the beautiful deer in Ashland.