Category: For authors


Tips for authors: interviews, part II

By Midge Raymond,

To follow up on Interviews, Part I, I’m happy to present a Q&A with Wendy Call, author of No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy. Wendy is a longtime journalist whose book is based on hundreds of interviews over ten years — and then, as part of her book tour, she ended up on the other side of the mic. She did more than a dozen radio interviews within a month of her book’s release and has a lot to share.

What are the best reasons for authors to do radio interviews?

The primary reason might not be to sell more copies of your book, but to reach a wider public with the idea(s) behind your book. In the month since my book No Word for Welcome was released, I’ve given fifteen radio interviews. Perhaps two times out of three, I notice a bump in my Amazon sales ranking in the hours after the interview airs. When I don’t, it certainly doesn’t mean the interview was a waste. I can think of many, many times I’ve listened to an author interview, and then checked her book out of the library, or discussed the author’s work with a friend. When I buy the author’s book, it’s usually weeks or months after – most often after I’ve read or heard something else about the author.

If you land a radio interview in a city where you’re giving a reading, a radio interview can bring a larger audience to your event. One of the very first readings I did for my book, No Word for Welcome, was in Los Angeles. I have a few friends and acquaintances in the city; a local organization helped me promote the event; and I did two radio interviews in the week prior to the reading. About one-third of the event’s attendees were my friends and colleagues, one-quarter were members of the organization that helped with promotion, a few came because of a mutual friend’s recommendation, and the remaining quarter came because they heard one of the interviews. So, radio interviews help, but they should be only one part of a wider promotion strategy.

What did you do to prepare yourself for being interviewed?

My publicist and I spent quite a bit of time developing a list of “suggested questions” that were sent out to each of the radio hosts being approached, making sure that those questions covered each of the major themes and ideas of my book. I then devoted about six hours to crafting careful answers to each of the questions. Of course, many of the interviewers asked their own questions, but having those well-rehearsed answers has really helped. My publicist and I also did an hour-long “mock interview” over the phone.

I also do whatever is necessary to get enough sleep the night before the interview – it really does make a difference in both clarity of thought and quality of voice.

 

If there is one single thing an author should do before an interview, what should that be?

Relax for several minutes before the appointed time, breathe deeply, and review the three key points you want to make in the interview. (Note: “Readers, buy my book!” is not one of them!)

 

Do you have any tips for writers being interviewed for the first time?

Think in terms of vignette and story.

Listen to author interviews and think carefully about what appeals to you and what doesn’t. While preparing for my interviews, I listened to NPR’s audio archives. I found that the most compelling interviews are those in which the author offers clear, specific, brief vignettes to make her primary points.

Don’t expect the interviewer to read your book.

Radio hosts are extremely busy people; some interview three or four authors each week. I know very few people who read three or four books every week. I’ve had interviewers who had clearly read most or all of my book, and others who hadn’t read past the flap copy. While I’m grateful to those who did read it, I have to say it’s fine either way. To be honest, it’s often easier when the interviewer hasn’t read the book. Those interviewers tend to ask more basic questions, so it’s easier to give answers that will make sense to an audience that knows absolutely nothing about you or your book.

Be grateful.

There are far more books being published than there are radio hosts to interview those books’ authors. Any radio host who chooses to interview you is giving you a real gift.

To hear Wendy putting these tips into practice, you can listen to her interview with KPFK, as well as her interview with WBAI (her segment begins 15 minutes in).

And for more on author interviews, check out Everyday Book Marketing, in which you’ll find more advice from Wendy and many others.

Tips for authors: interviews, part I

By Midge Raymond,

These next two posts on interviews feature Elizabeth Austen and Wendy Call, both of whom have vast, invaluable experience as both interviewer and interviewee.

Today’s Q&A is with Elizabeth Austen, who has interviewed dozens of writers over the past ten years years for KUOW, 94.9, one of Seattle’s NPR affiliates. She is also a poet, performer, and teacher who has been interviewed countless times herself — and she has a lot to share about how to give your very best in a live interview. (Click here to find some of Elizabeth’s interviews.)

 

 

What are some of the best ways an author can prepare for a live interview?

The most important thing is to spend some time beforehand thinking about what you want to say about your work. Imagine the interview is already over: What do you want to have said? What would you regret NOT saying?

Often, the person interviewing you will not have had time to read your book. So you need to be prepared with a short description of it. What’s your book about? Why did you write it, and why did you write it this way? How is it different from your previous work? Is there an interesting story about how it got published? Also think about what you want to say about how you got started writing and why you continue to do it. You’re essentially interviewer-proofing yourself. Hopefully you’ll get an interviewer who is genuinely interested in you and your book, and will talk with you briefly before the interview starts about what he/she wants to discuss, but you can’t depend on that.

Also, choose a couple of short excerpts or a few short poems that you might read aloud. What would provide a good introduction to the book? Practice reading aloud, and practice giving a concise introduction to what you’re going to read.

If you have time, I recommend listening online to an example or two of your interviewer’s program, so that you’ll have a sense of what to expect in terms of tone and approach. Does this interviewer tend to ask more about craft and process, or about the backstory of the book or individual poems? Is the interviewer looking for anecdotes and stories? Does it seem like the interviewer has actually read the book?

I’m a great believer in preparing for anything, and then letting go of the preparation during the interview so you can respond to what’s actually happening in the conversation. The most important thing is to be present. In the moment, approach it like you would any conversation with someone you care about — by listening and responding as honestly and generously as you can.

What if you’re asked a question you can’t (or don’t wish to) answer?

If there are topics that you consider off-limits for the interview, try to come to an understanding about that with your interviewer beforehand. Remember that it’s perfectly fine to admit that you don’t know the answer to
a question. Maybe the interviewer is suggesting something you’ve never considered before — just say so, and answer as fully as you can in the moment.

And if the question seems intrusive or inappropriate to you, then take a deep breath and pose a different question to yourself, and the answer. Perhaps something like this: “For me, the real question is….”  or “Well, I’m more interested in why…”

Do you have any broadcasting secrets for how to sound your best on the radio?

Well, they’re not really secrets, but here are a couple of things to keep in mind. Try to get a good night’s sleep, but don’t freak out if you don’t. For a variety of reasons that I won’t go into here, I got less than four hours of sleep the night before I was interviewed on KUOW along with former poet laureate Billy Collins. I think I was actually too sleep-deprived to be
nervous. However, I don’t recommend this as a tactic, in general! [Editor’s note: One would never guess that Elizabeth didn’t sleep 8 hours that night. It was an amazing interview and discussion.]

Of course, avoid dairy products for a few hours before and don’t drink so much caffeine that you’re twitchy. Keep your feet on the ground, remember to breathe, and most of all, treat the interview like you would a conversation — that means listening as well as speaking.

And on a technical note —  before the interview starts, try to get a chance to talk into the microphone to make sure you’re not too close or too far away.

Do you have advice for writers who get nervous before interviews?

Does anybody not get nervous before interviews? I know I do — whether I’m the interviewer or the interviewee. I have a mantra that I tell myself before I perform, and it’s equally true when I’m interviewing or being interviewed: “The performance requires me, but it’s not about me.” In other words, I need to show up and be present, but the focus is on the work, not on me or my ego (even if I’m talking about my process or any autobiographical connection to the material). The point — whether in a performance or an interview–is to help the reader connect to the work. When I keep my focus on that, my anxiety is much less likely to take over. Another thing to remember is that the nervousness is a kind of necessary fuel.

What if you make a mistake on the air — is there any way to overcome that?

The fact is that the best radio is made when people are actually talking to each other — so that means they’re going to make mistakes sometimes. If you mis-state something and realize it on the air, just correct yourself. If the interview is being recorded, and you stumble while reading an excerpt from your book, just back up to the beginning of a sentence — they can correct it in the editing room. If you’re reading live, just go with it, like you would at a live reading. You don’t have to be perfect. You just have to be you (hmmm — and maybe that’s the scarier prospect!)

Tomorrow, come back for a Q&A with Wendy Call, with more interviewing advice for writers…

And for more on author interviews, check out Everyday Book Marketing, in which you’ll find more advice from Elizabeth and many others.

Artists have power, and with power comes responsibility

By John Yunker,

Guernica

Every artist has power. This is something I didn’t realize when I was younger.

I didn’t realize that ideas are powerful and artists wield this power — even if they don’t realize it.

Even if they’re at home struggling over a novel that they think may never see the light of day.

There is an inherent power in all of these stories that we tell.

As artists, the stories we choose to tell come at the expense of the stories we choose not to tell.

Every struggling artist wrestles with this choice between telling the story he or she wants to tell and telling the story he or she thinks will sell.

Sometimes the stars align and one story achieves both goals.

But you can’t know that when you’re staring at a blank piece of paper or impatiently blinking cursor. You can’t know what story will sell. Don’t kid yourself. Nobody could have predicted Harry Potter. Nobody could have predicted Twilight.

Publishers took a chance on these works and, in doing so, won the lottery.

But before the publishers could take that risk writers had to tell the stories they wanted to tell, stories that they wanted to hear.

As a writer, I have to remind myself every so often that the only thing that matters is that I write something that I want to read. Nothing else matters.

And if the story you want to read means taking the path less traveled, so be it.

If a friend or partner or teacher tells you that you’ll never get that story published, ignore them.

After all, you can always self-publish.

More important, you have a responsibility to tell your story.

“We just give people what they want,” is a common refrain in the entertainment industry.

It’s a lie.

In truth, producers and publishers give people what they think they will like, based on previous blockbusters and bestsellers, which often has very little do with what people really want. And for these we must also blame artists.

Some artists tell the stories they want to hear. Others tell the stories they think the public wants to hear.

As an artist, I urge you to tell the stories that you want to hear.

Happy Typewriter Day!

By Midge Raymond,

That’s right — June 23 is World Typewriter Day. And we’re celebrating with a special promotion for our vintage typewriter notecards.

This mixed set of 12 notecards features three each of these antique typewriters: the Remington Rand Portable (circa 1940) and the L.C. Smith & Corona Model 8 (circa 1929), both from our own collection, as well as The Chicago (1899) and the Crandall, New Model (1886), from the spectacular Martin Howard Collection.

This Typewriter Day special saves you 40 percent (or more, depending on how many boxes you order), and shipping is free for all U.S. orders. (If you’re a typewriter aficionado who lives outside the U.S., please contact us!)

Wishing you all a very happy Typewriter Day.

Among Animals 2: We’re a third of the way there…

By John Yunker,

I want to first thank everyone who has submitted so far to our second edition of the Among Animals anthology.

We’re continually impressed by the quality of the stories we’ve received. It’s especially gratifying to hear from those writers who “get” what it is we’re trying to achieve with this collection.

That said, we’re still looking for more writers who share our vision.

You can submit your short story (there’s no reading fee) here. Note that we will accept previously published stories just so long as you you hold the rights.

And if you have any questions, please contact us. We look forward to reading your stories!