Ashland Creek Press is coming to Australia (updated)

By John Yunker,

 

Ashland Creek Press Australia

Calling all Aussies!

We are headed to Australia during the first two weeks in September and would love to connect.

We’ll be participating in several events in various cities, including:

Adelaide: September 4

We will be teaching a full-day class on author book promotion at the SA Writers Centre.

Every participant will walk away with a custom book marketing plan — along with a free copy of Everyday Book Marketing. You can learn more and register here.

Melbourne: September 6-7

We don’t have anything scheduled just yet, except for hoping to see the little penguins.

Brisbane Writer’s Festival: September 8-11

Midge Raymond will be speaking and teaching throughout the festival. You can learn more and register here.

Sydney: September 12-14

Join us for a free seminar titled Writing about Animals: Literature’s evolving relationship with the animal kingdom. We’ll be joined by Among Animals 2 contributor Sascha Morrell. The event will be held at the University of Sydney (New Law Building, Seminar Room 028) on September 13th from Noon to 2pm.

If you’re in one of these cities and would like to meet, let us know!

We can also hand-delivery any of our books — Amazon can’t beat that!

 

Dogland featured on Our Hen House

By John Yunker,

Screen Shot 2016-07-09 at 8.19.10 AM

We were thrilled to hear Dogland reviewed by Robin Lamont on the Our Hen House podcast.

Among the many great things said about the book, Robin said she would recommend the book for anyone who has rescued a dog or is planning to do so. We certainly agree!

You can listen to the review here.

Introducing the ACP Book Bag

By John Yunker,

Thanks to Ashland (and many other cities) banning plastic bags, we thought we all could use a great grocery/book/everything bag. (We’re also enjoying the chance to show our Oregon pride.)

We created a small quantity of these recycled-cotton bags — environmentally friendly, fair-labor produced — and so far, it’s been perfect for books, groceries, and everything else we’ve toted around. It’s lightweight (folds easily into a smaller bag), durable, and, if we might say so, quite good-looking.

acp book bag

If you’d like to order a bag of your own, you can do so here.

Or get the bag free when you order this ACP Book Bundle.

Thanks for your support of ACP and the planet!

Call for Submissions: Writing for Animals Nonfiction Anthology

By John Yunker,

Ashland Creek Press is currently accepting nonfiction submissions for a new anthology, Writing for Animals: An anthology for writers and instructors to educate and inspire.

From Franz Kafka’s Report to the Academy to Karen Joy Fowler’s We Are Completely Beside Ourselves, animals have played a central role in literature. Increasingly, writers are playing a central role in advancing awareness of animal issues through the written word.

And yet little has been written about the process of writing about animals—from crafting point of view to voice. Writers who hope to raise awareness face many questions and choices in their work, from how to educate without being didactic to how to develop animals as characters for an audience that still views them as ingredients. We hope to address these issues and more with a new collection of articles, by writers and for writers—but most of all, for the animals.

We seek articles from authors and educators about the process of writing about animals in literature.* Our focus is on including a mix of instructional and inspirational articles to help readers not only improve their work but be inspired to keep at it. Articles may be previously published and should not exceed 10,000 words.

There is no deadline at this time; we will accept submissions on a rolling basis until further notice. Accepted submissions will receive a stipend of $100 plus a copy of the finished book upon publication.

*Please note that this is a collection of instructional articles about the craft of writing. We will NOT be publishing animal stories or personal essays, only articles that deal specifically with the art and craft of writing about animals.

Areas of interest include:

  • Anthropomorphism and writing from the animal’s point of view
  • The rethinking of animal-centric idioms (such as “fish out of water” or “kill two birds with one stone”)
  • How to elevate animals from “set pieces” to “characters” in your writing
  • How to address violence toward animals
  • Animal rescue themes
  • Animals and “personhood”
  • The “animal turn” and what it means for animal-centric literature
  • Animals in children’s literature

For all submissions, please include (in a single document) the entire essay and an author bio listing all publishing credits, awards, and experience. Include a valid e-mail address, mailing address, and phone number.

And, just to be clear, we are not looking for essays about animals. We are looking for articles about writing about animals.

All submissions must be made using Submittable.

 

A vegan Tesla marks a redefining of luxury

By John Yunker,

Screen Shot 2016-01-14 at 7.07.57 PM

It was very happy to see today that Tesla is now offering a vegan-friendly model of its cars, primarily meaning no leather.

Not that I’m about to rush out and buy one anytime soon (you can get a leather-free Subaru for quite a bit less). But it’s gratifying to see people with means pressuring luxury automakers to rethink “luxury” automobiles. Kudos to Leilani Münter (pictured above) for using her sway as professional racecar driver to ask Elon Musk to offer this option. Before her, Mark and Elizabeth Peters, shareholders of Tesla, presented their request for a vegan model at a shareholders meeting. These voices made a difference. Not that leather-free Teslas are going to singlehandedly put an end to the horrific leather industry, but this positive action might get people thinking about how they view leather — something we don’t usually think about.

Leather has long been synonymous with luxury — whereas in reality, it is synonymous with cruelty. And the leather industry is notoriously rough on the environment. So while I’d love to see Tesla, as an environmentally friendly company, remove the leather option entirely, these things take time — and this is an important first step.

What will the world look like when leather is no longer viewed as a luxury material but as something tragic and sad? When environmentalists realize that wearing leather (or getting this option in your electric car) is anything but helpful to the environment?

That day will come. For more and more of us, it has already arrived — and the more we see positive actions like this, the more awareness will spread.

 

  Category: On animals, Vegan
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