Finding quality writing time

Midge Raymond

Ashland Creek Press co-founder Midge Raymond is the author of the award-winning short story collection FORGETTING ENGLISH and a novel, MY LAST CONTINENT. Learn more at MidgeRaymond.com.

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“I’ll never have it as good as prison again,” said author Dewitt Gilmore once told New York Times. “For writing, anyway.”

This New York Times article, “Street Lit With Publishing Cred: From Prison to a Four-Book Deal,” seems to be  proof that writers do need rooms of their own: Gilmore (whose pen name is Relentless Aaron) began writing his street-lit novels in 1996 during a stint in a federal prison in New Jersey; eventually, he got a six-figure book deal with St. Martin’s Press. He’s written thirty manuscripts, has printed ten of them himself, and will publish his next four with St. Martin’s.

As Gilmore told the Times, referring to the time he spent in the solitary confinment of an eight-by-four cell, “Nothing could match solitary for writing.”

I couldn’t agree more. What I recommend, however, is not a trip to prison. Instead, I’ll suggest a few ways to create your own “solitary confinement” — especially for writers who need to fit their work in among day jobs, families, and other things that might otherwise make writing time a challenge.

Think of yourself as a writer. If you don’t see yourself as a writer, how will you allow yourself the time to write? First, tell yourself that your work is important. Remind yourself that you have things to say. Be adamant about setting aside time to say them.

Remind your friends and family that you are a writer. When you create time in your schedule to write — especially when it takes time away from them — make it known that you are working. Because you are working — no matter what pleasure writing brings you, it’s also hard work.

Create your own writing space. Even if it’s just a tiny desk in the smallest corner of your home, make it your own. Get rid of anything that might distract you, and keep near you the things that inspire you: books, candles, artwork.

– Schedule your writing time. My friend Stacey is a life coach who offers this amazing advice: Take your writing time as seriously as any job. If you work at Starbucks, she points out, you’d have to clock in, right? And so it should be with your writing time: Get it on the calendar, show up, and complete your shift.

– Find a writing buddy. Having a good support system is essential for all of us, and especially for writers. Join a writing group that forces you to show up with written pages on deadline, for example — or find a writing buddy to meet at a cafe for an hour of freewriting. The nice thing about a writing buddy or group is that you’re accountable: you have to show up (or you have to have a good excuse for why you didn’t).

Happy writing.

 

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Ashland Creek Press co-founder Midge Raymond is the author of the award-winning short story collection FORGETTING ENGLISH and a novel, MY LAST CONTINENT. Learn more at MidgeRaymond.com.

Latest posts by Midge Raymond (see all)